Places

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Arr 4

Place de la Bastille

The square remains the symbol of revolutionary change and the end to despotism despite no trace remaining of the original Bastille fort

Arr14

Montparnasse Cemetery

Originally called ‘the Southern Cemetery’ it was opened in 1824 as one of four that made up a new network of burial places outside the …

Arr13

Boulevard Auguste-Blanqui

Arrondissement 13
Auguste Blanqui lived at No. 13 from 1878 until his death in 1881. At that time his address was in the Boulevard d’Italie, which was renamed in 1905

Arr14

Rue Boulard

Arrondissement 14
A street named after a rich ealry 19th century philanthropist it became home to one of France’s most influential left thinkers.

Arr14

Rue Cabanis

Arrondissements 14
A street with one of France’s most important psychiatric hospitals that treated, among many others, Althusser and Utrillo.

Arr14

Rue Campagne-Première

Arrondissements14
A short road with six plaques off the Boulevard Montparnasse testifies to its artistic, poetic and left connections.

Arr14

Rue Cels

Arrondissement 14
A short street a stone’s throw from Montparnasse cemetery, with one of the few plaques to leftists in Paris on No. 24

Arr14

Rue du Chateau

Arrondissement 14
A road that was once the centre of the Surrealists as many of them moved towards the Communist Party

Arr14

Rue Delambre

Arrondissement 14
A street frequented by lots of 20th century American celebrities with bars where at various times Sartre, De Beauvoir, Henry Miller and Man Ray might be found.

Arr14

Avenue Denfert-Rochereau

Arrondissement 14
A long tree-lined Avenue leading southwards to Paris’ tax wall entrance point that recalls moments of left history, from 1848 to 1940

Arr12

Boulevard Diderot

Arrondissement 12
The huge Mazas Prison was built opposite the Gare de Lyon in 1850. It was finally demolished in 1898. Hundreds of leftists passed through its gates in its half-century existence.

Arr15

Avenue Émile Zola

Arrondissement 15
An early 20th century road whose name testifies to the influence Zola had on the heart of French politics, Paris.

Arr11

Rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine

Arrondissements 11, 12
The road passes through the insurrectionary heart of the Paris working classes, with vivid memories of its barricades and struggles

Arr14

Rue de la Gaîté

Arrondissement 14
An amazing street still crammed with theatres and music halls, it was a natural meeting point for young lefties.

Arr14

Rue Gassendi

Arrondissement 14
On his first visit to Paris after escaping from Siberia in 1902, Natalia Sedova found Trotksy a place to live at No 46.

Arr14

Avenue General Leclerc

Arrondissement 14
The old main road to the south was full of cafes, many of which Lenin and other Russian exiles used to meet in,

Arr14

Rue de Gergovie

Arrondissement 6
Madeleine Pelletier and the cooperative producers movement of the 1890s are both associated with the street.

Arr13

Rue Godefroy

Arrondissement 13
An early 19th century street that has been partly rebuilt, with its claim to left fame – or infamy – because Zhou Enlai lodged at No 17 for nearly two years from 1922 to 1924 while working more or less directly for the Communist International

Arr 5

Boulevard de l’Hôpital

Arrondissement 5, 13
A Boulevard whose hospital has a history as well as a reputation.

Arr13

Place d’Italie

Arrondissement 13
A huge traffic roundabout today, created at the southern gate to Paris, the square saw some of the most bloody barricade fighting in June 1848 and May 1871.