Places

The locations (listed by Arrondissement) where those of the left lived, worked and met as well as the areas where significant events took place.

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Rue de l’Abbé de L’Epée

Arrondissement 5
The location of the FTP command headquarters in August 1944 during the liberation of Paris

Square Alban Satragne

Arrondissement 10
The present square includes the chapel of the Saint-Lazare prison. It started as a leper colony run by monks in the 17th century and then as a special prison for the well-to-do.

Rue André del Sarte

Arrondissement 18
Renamed from rue Saint-André in 1880 to honour a 16th century Italian painter, its left significance is that the Left Opposition journal, La revolution proletarienne, first saw the light of day at No 17 in 1925.

Rue de l’Arbre Sec

Arrondissement 1
One of Paris’ ancient streets in the heart of the old city on the North (right) bank of the Seine it links Engels and 21st century Trotskyists

Rue des Archives

Arrondissement 3
Housing the Museum of National Archives the road has also witnessed barricades and many left meetings

Boulevard Auguste-Blanqui

Arrondissement 13
Auguste Blanqui lived at No. 13 from 1878 until his death in 1881. At that time his address was in the Boulevard d’Italie, which was renamed in 1905

Rue Auguste Comte

Arrondissement 6
A street overlooking the Luxembourg Garden where Trotsky decided to found the Fourth International

Rue d’Auteuil

Arrondissement 16
The site of a building that played a big part in stoking up republican sentiment against Louis-Napoléon in 1870

Boulevard des Batignolles

Arrondissement 17
Louise Michel lived at No. 88 just outside Paris proper for a few months in 1856. It was then a low rent, strongly working-class district.

Boulevard Beaumarchais

Arrondissement 11
The site of a concert hall whose name changed from the late 19th century (Café-concert l’Époque) to Concert Pacra, then Chansonia in 1925.

Rue Beaubourg

Arrondissement 3
Before Haussmann and recent rebuilding this was 12 Rue Transnonain, where soldiers massacred everyone living in the house in 1834.

Rue Béranger

Named after the biggest poet song-writer of the 19th century who was jailed twice for his anti-Monarchism.

Place Blanche

Arrondissement 18
A bustling square on the 1791-1860 northern boundary of Paris. Its barricade in May 1871 involved fighter from the Women’s Union. Today, home to Le Moulin Rouge.

Rue Bonaparte

Arrondissement 6
A pretty street leading from the Seine to St Germain-des- Prés with memories of barricades in 1871, Sartre in the 1950s and ‘realist’ art and the Algerian War in the 1960s.

Boulevard Bonne-Nouvelle

Arrondissements 2, 10
A very broad street built on the demolished ramparts and moat of the 16th century city wall it has frequently seen left political demonstrations being attacked by police.

Rue Boulard

Arrondissement 14
A street named after a rich ealry 19th century philanthropist it became home to one of France’s most influential left thinkers.

Rue des Bourdonnais

Arrondissement 1
One of central Paris’ very early streets it was repeatedly straightened and given different names. for the left it was the centre of the February 1848 Revolution.

Rue de Bourgogne

Arrondissement 7
An 18th century road built on fields led away from the Seine. In 1728 the Palais Bourbon was built at its northern end, bringing with it regular demonstrations.

Rue Bréguet

Arrondissement 11
The offices of the Union nationale des combattants coloniaux which in 1940 became a cover for a resistance network

Rue de Bretagne

Arrondissement 3
An old 17th century road dating from 1608 in the early 20th century it included a cafe and restaurant where Lenin spent an evening listening to revolutionary songs

Rue de Bruxelles

Arrondissement 9
A short street where Zola lived for 13 years and then died accidentally or was murdered.

Rue de la Bûcherie

Arrondissement 5
A very old street in what was the poorest part of Paris, it used to house a school of medicine and until the 1970s many working class restaurants

Rue Cabanis

Arrondissements 14
A street with one of France’s most important psychiatric hospitals that treated, among many others, Althusser and Utrillo.

Rue Cadet

Arrondissement 9
An old short bustling street with surrealist and Masonic connections that in the 17th and 18th centuries led to a rubbish dump

Rue Cambacérès / Rue de la Ville l’Évêque

Arrondissement 8
The first meetings of what became the Communist Conspiracy of Equals took place here in 1795. Buonarroti was its only survivor.

Rue Campagne-Première

Arrondissements14
A short road with six plaques off the Boulevard Montparnasse testifies to its artistic, poetic and left connections.

Boulevard des Capucines

Arrondissement 2, 9
One of the Grand Boulevards Karl Marx and Louise Michel have both walked the street painted by Monet

Rue Carducci

Arrondissement 19
Albert Treint, one of the first leaders of the French Communists, was living here in Belleville with his wife and son.

Avenue Carnot

Arrondissement 17
A short tree-lined wealthy-peopled avenue leading from the Arc de Triomphe it was where Aragon’s father bought a small boarding house business for the mother of his illegitimate child

Rue Cels

Arrondissement 14
A short street a stone’s throw from Montparnasse cemetery, with one of the few plaques to leftists in Paris on No. 24

Palais de Chaillot / Place du Trocadéro

Arrondissement 16
The Chaillot Palace is the place to see the Eiffel Tower and the Hotel des Invalides and be seen. It also has a history of resistance.

Le Champ-de-Mars

The huge public garden between the Military School and the River Seine now includes Paris’ most famous landmark. It also witnessed much of France’s left history.

Rue Championnet

Arrondissement 18
In 1868 Louise Michel started to teach a class in this street that was then called rue Oudot for some 60 children at the school run by Mademoiselle Poulin.

Boulevard de la Chapelle

Arrondissements 10, 18
Built outside the 18th century tax wall around Paris it was used in 1900 to host part of the metro system’s Line 2

Rue Charlemagne

One of Paris’ oldest streets in the Marais houses the Charlemagne Secondary School, attended by many of France’s leftists in the 19th and 20th centuries

Rue de Charonne

Arrondissement 11
Ho Chi Minh stayed in this street when he first arrived in Paris in 1917, before he was traced by the police. In 1962 the police killed 9 CGT anti-OAS demonstrators outside the Charonne metro station

Rue du Chateau

Arrondissement 14
A road that was once the centre of the Surrealists as many of them moved towards the Communist Party

Rue du Château d’Eau

Arrondissement 10
Louise Michel’s first teaching post in Paris was at Mme Vollier’s boarding school at No 14 in 1856-7. It is just up the road from Paris’ first Bourse du Travail.

Rue du Cherche-Midi

Arrondissement 6
An old and now lengthy street where Marx’s daughter Laura and his son-in-law, Paul Lafargue lived for over 40 years.

Rue de la Clef / Sainte-Pélagie prison

Arrondissement 5
The Sainte-Pélagie prison built in 1662 was entered through 2 rue du Puits-de-l’Érmite. It was initially a home for fallen women.