Places

The locations (listed by Arrondissement) where those of the left lived, worked and met as well as the areas where significant events took place.

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Rue Championnet

Arrondissement 18
In 1868 Louise Michel started to teach a class in this street that was then called rue Oudot for some 60 children at the school run by Mademoiselle Poulin.

Boulevard de la Chapelle

Arrondissements 10, 18
Built outside the 18th century tax wall around Paris it was used in 1900 to host part of the metro system’s Line 2

Rue Charlemagne

One of Paris’ oldest streets in the Marais houses the Charlemagne Secondary School, attended by many of France’s leftists in the 19th and 20th centuries

Rue de Charonne

Arrondissement 11
Ho Chi Minh stayed in this street when he first arrived in Paris in 1917, before he was traced by the police. In 1962 the police killed 9 CGT anti-OAS demonstrators outside the Charonne metro station

Rue du Chateau

Arrondissement 14
A road that was once the centre of the Surrealists as many of them moved towards the Communist Party

Rue du Château d’Eau

Arrondissement 10
Louise Michel’s first teaching post in Paris was at Mme Vollier’s boarding school at No 14 in 1856-7. It is just up the road from Paris’ first Bourse du Travail.

Rue du Cherche-Midi

Arrondissement 6
An old and now lengthy street where Marx’s daughter Laura and his son-in-law, Paul Lafargue lived for over 40 years.

Rue de la Clef / Sainte-Pélagie prison

Arrondissement 5
The Sainte-Pélagie prison built in 1662 was entered through 2 rue du Puits-de-l’Érmite. It was initially a home for fallen women.

Rue Claude Bernard

Arrondissement 5
A Haussmann-era street that saw many of France’s republicans and socialists walk along it under the Second Empire.

Rue de Clignancourt

Arrondissement 18
The 18th Arrondissement’s Vigilance Committee met at the flat (No. 41) of the Blanquist Théo Ferré, a friend of Louise Michel, during the Paris Commune.

Boulevard de Clichy

Arrondissements 9, 18
A Boulevard with a long and vibrant history of left political and artistic creativity

Rue Clovis

Arrondissement 5
A short street with an old tower that once signalled the presence of a huge abbey that was the meeting place of the first French communist revolutionaries and is now a highly respectable Lycee

Rue des Cloÿs

Arrondissement 18
The site of the day school at No. 5 bought by Louise Michel’s mother for her daughter to secure her living in 1865. No. 17 has a PCF resistance history to it.

Rue Commines

Arrondissement 3
A Marais street that was home to the German Communist League that hosted Marx in 1848

Place de la Concorde

The largest square in Paris has witnessed many of France’s more signficant revolutionary moments

Rue de Condé

Arrondissement 6
Where there is now a little garden the Foyot restaurant at Number 36 was bombed (possibly by the anarchist art critic Félix Fénéon) in 1894.

Conciergerie

Arrondissement 1
The 11th century royal dungeon is best known for putting up Marie-Antoinette and Robespierre before their executions, but it was still used to imprison leftists in the 1830s and 1840s.

Rue de Courcelles

Arrondissement 8, 17
A road with special relevance to trade union struggles both to secure unemployment benefit and to change the world

Rue du Croissant

Arrondissement 2
In the 19th century this street became a major centre of left republican and then socialist publications.

Rue Danton

Arrondissement 6
While No. 1 was the first Paris building made of reinforced concrete, the narrow street is best known for its left political meetings in the mansion built in 1888-1890 and 1899-1900 to house the Parisian scientific associations.

Rue Daubenton

Arrondissement 5
A street linked to the revolutionary syndicalist direct action tendency of the CGT, the only trade union confederation in 1908, and also, strangely, to the start of the French 16th century wars of religion.

Rue Dauphine

Arrondissement 6
Paris’ widest street in the 17th century, It is famous today for Picasso’s Guernica but it also has a much longer left history.

Rue Delambre

Arrondissement 14
A street frequented by lots of 20th century American celebrities with bars where at various times Sartre, De Beauvoir, Henry Miller and Man Ray might be found.

Avenue Denfert-Rochereau

Arrondissement 14
A long tree-lined Avenue leading southwards to Paris’ tax wall entrance point that recalls moments of left history, from 1848 to 1940

Boulevard Diderot

Arrondissement 12
The huge Mazas Prison was built opposite the Gare de Lyon in 1850. It was finally demolished in 1898. Hundreds of leftists passed through its gates in its half-century existence.

Rue Dupuytren

Arrondissement 6
A short street now full of hair salons, in May 1871 it was where Louise Michel set up the first school to teach young women draftsmanship, industrial art.

Rue de l’École-de-Médecine

The home of the most radical revolutionaries from 1790 to 1794, and again in 1848 and 1870, the road was shortened when the Boulevard St Germain was built in the 1860s and it saw action again in 1968

Rue des Écoles

Arrondissement 5
A street with memories of Marxism and libertarian thought. The La Vogue art journal, and the Practical School of Advanced Studies, where Lenin lectured in 1902 and 1903.

Rue Édouard Quenu

Arrondissement 5
The editorial offices at No. 4 of the libertarian Les Temps Nouveaux edited by Jean Grave from 1902 to August 1914 when it was banned.

Tour Eiffel / Eiffel Tower

Arrondissement 7
Paris’ top icon, built in 1889, commemorated the French Revolution of 1789

Avenue Élisée-Reclus

Arrondissement 7
A street opened up and named in 1907 after a man who had not lived in Paris since 1871 during a period of left ascendancy on Paris municipal council. This commemoration was partially retracted by the next council.

Avenue Émile Zola

Arrondissement 15
An early 20th century road whose name testifies to the influence Zola had on the heart of French politics, Paris.

Rue de l’Éperon

Arrondissement 6
A short, very old street, that houses a Lycee associated with Simone de Beauvoir and Simone Weil.

Rue de l’Estrapade

Arrondissement 5
A very old street, built on the line of the Philippe Auguste medieval wall it marks the southern limit of the Latin Quarter. Lenin lodged here in 1902.

Rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine

Arrondissements 11, 12
The road passes through the insurrectionary heart of the Paris working classes, with vivid memories of its barricades and struggles

Rue du Faubourg St Denis

Arrondissement 10
The old royal route into Paris from the North witnessed barricades, demonstrations and resistance. It also housed a major Paris prison.

Rue Favart

Arrondissement 2
Lenin, Trotksy, Krupskaya and Natalya saw a show at the Comic Opera together in 1902. It was founded by Louis IV in 1714.

Rue des Feuillantines

Arrondissement 5
From January 1914 until September 1916 Trotsky edited with Julius Martov the newspaper called successively ‘The Voice’, ‘Our Word’ and finally ‘The Beginning’ at an office here.

Rue Feutrier

Arrondissement 18
Leads to the garden renamed Square Louise-Michel .Since 2010 it has a plaque commemorating Rosa Luxemburg’s short stay there in 1893.

Rue du Four

Arrondissement 6
Unemployed marchers stole bread from three bakeries here in 1883. In 1943 No. 48 witnessed the first full meeting of the united French resistance under Jean Moulin