Places

The locations (listed by Arrondissement) where those of the left lived, worked and met as well as the areas where significant events took place.

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Rue des Francs-Bourgeois

A 14th century road still full of aristocratic town mansions including one that now houses the National Archives, as well as memories of Barbes, Blanqui and Blum.

Rue Gabrielle

Arrondissement 18
A Montmartre street with an artistic, literary and left history

Rue de la Gaîté

Arrondissement 14
An amazing street still crammed with theatres and music halls, it was a natural meeting point for young lefties.

Place Gambetta

Arrondissements 20
A square in what was a working class area of North-Eastern Paris that played a part in the 1871 Paris Commune, and has strong connections with two of the surviving Communards

Rue Gassendi

Arrondissement 14
On his first visit to Paris after escaping from Siberia in 1902, Natalia Sedova found Trotksy a place to live at No 46.

Avenue General Leclerc

Arrondissement 14
The old main road to the south was full of cafes, many of which Lenin and other Russian exiles used to meet in,

Rue de Gergovie

Arrondissement 6
Madeleine Pelletier and the cooperative producers movement of the 1890s are both associated with the street.

Rue Godefroy

Arrondissement 13
An early 19th century street that has been partly rebuilt, with its claim to left fame – or infamy – because Zhou Enlai lodged at No 17 for nearly two years from 1922 to 1924 while working more or less directly for the Communist International

Quai des Grands Augustins

Arrondissement 6
A 14th century city improvement to prevent flooding, the quay has strong associations with early socialists and surrealist resistance to the German occupation

Rue Guy-de-La-Brosse

Arrondissement 5
The Quakers established a Youth Centre here in 1928 and attracted and politicised many young people, including Lucie Bernard

Rue Guynemer

Arrondissement 6
Léon Blum lived here in 1898, helping Émile Zola’s defence team, as the Dreyfus campaign was at its height.

Rue de Hanovre

Arrondissement 2
A rather inconspicuous street (with the exception of its 1907 art nouveau building) it was one of the streets Blanqui carried his rifle down in 1830.

Rue de la Harpe

Arrondissement 5
Blanqui lived at No. 85 while fighting in the 1830 Revolution. In 1848 the Jacobin Club met at No. 63. These addresses no longer exist after the road was shortened under Haussmann.

Rue Hautefeuille

Arrondissement 6
A street that ran South from the Place St Michel lost some but not all of its history when Haussmann built Boulevard St Germain across it.

Rue du Havre

Arrondissements 8, 9
A short road just in front of the Saint-Lazare station, its left history includes romance and human rights.

Boulevard de l’Hôpital

Arrondissement 5, 13
A Boulevard whose hospital has a history as well as a reputation.

Rue Houdon

Arrondissement 18
Louise Michel lived here from 1865 to 1871 while running her own day school in the Rue des Cloÿs.

Place d’Italie

Arrondissement 13
A huge traffic roundabout today, created at the southern gate to Paris, the square saw some of the most bloody barricade fighting in June 1848 and May 1871.

Boulevard des Italiens

Arrondissement 2, 9
This posh boulevard between the 2nd and 9th arrondissement was within walking distance of poverty-struck working-class Paris. It has no history of barricades.

Avenue d’Ivry

Arrondissement 13
The broad Avenue marks the Eastern limit of Paris’ Asiatic quarter. It leads to Ivry and what was once a major stronghold of municipal communism.

Place Joachim de Bellay

Arrondissement 1
The Paris fruit and vegetable market, the Marché des Innocents, was created in 1787. Its fountain is now the centre of this new square.

Rue Jacob

Arrondissement 6
This old narrow street running parallel to the Seine has both an international and a left history.

Rue Jacques Callot

Arrondissement 6
A very short road with an address that brought revolutionaries of all kinds there in the 1920s

Rue Japy

Arrondissements 11
The Salle Japy, a huge meeting place, has considerable significance for the left from 1899 onwards, but it was also used to round-up Jews in 1942.

Quai de Jemmapes

Arrondissement 10
Running alongside the Canal St Martin the Quai was home to a syndicalist and anarchist bookshop in the 1910s and 1920s. It’s now the hotel.Citizen.

Rue Laffitte

Arrondissement 9
A street that lived fin de siècle art and culture with a name from the Glorious Revolution, it hosted the editorial offices of La Revue Blanche

Rue Lalande

Arrondissement 14
Natalya Sedova’s flat was the meeting place of the Iskra group of exiled Russian Social Democrats in Paris in 1902 and was where she first met Trotksy

Rue Léon-Frot

A 1.5 km-long road it housed two leftists who were both imprisoned and in one case shot because of their commitment.

Rue Lepic

Arrondissement 18
A street with the purpose of allowing Bonaparte to ascend Montmartre, it was the scene of important barricades in the Commune.

Rue Levert

Arrondissement 20
A road in the Belleville area that was incorporated into Paris in 1863 with connections to late 19th century French socialists and trade unionists.

Rue de Lille

Arrondissement 7
A very ancient street whose name changes reveal the history of France since 1789, and where Engels and Marx lived close to two major institutions of the French state

Square Louise-Michel

Arrondissement 18
On the site of Roman era gypsum quarries on the Montmartre hill. In 2005, only after the left first won a majority in the Paris Municipal elections of 2001, the Square was renamed Louise-Michel in memory of the Communards.

Palais du Louvre

Arrondissement 1
The Louvre Palace was stormed in 1830 and in September 1870 Courbet and dozens of artists set up a Commission for the protection of the Heritage of Paris’ museums.

Jardin du Luxembourg

Arrondissement 6
Laid out for Marie de Medici (Henry IV’s widow) from 1612 at the back of her new palace, the gardens were extended to include confiscated land from the Carthusian monks at the French Revolution.

Palais du Luxembourg

Arrondissement 6
The 17th century Palace is now the home of mainly ageing conservative senators. In the years between it witnessed many of France’s key historical moments.

Avenue du Maine

A broad avenue with strong vibes of the early 20th century art scene, and of late 20th century trade unionism

Rue Mandar

Arrondissement 2
The Café du Centre is on the site of a café that Blanqui and Barbès used as their HQ during the May 1839 insurrection of the Société des Saisons.

Rue Marbeuf

Arrondissement 8
A posh street between the Avenue George V and the Champs-Élysées, 16 houses were owned by a major collaborator and were requisitioned in 1944.

Rue Marie Rose

Arrondissement 14
The street where Lenin, Krupskaya and Inessa Armand lived in 1910-12, and where Lenin repaired his bicycle.

Rue des Martyrs

Arrondissement s 9, 18
A busy, narrow road that played a big part in French culture, with connections on the left to songs and art