Places

The locations (listed by Arrondissement) where those of the left lived, worked and met as well as the areas where significant events took place.

  • All
  • Arr 1
  • Arr 2
  • Arr 3
  • Arr 4
  • Arr 5
  • Arr 6
  • Arr 7
  • Arr 8
  • Arr 9
  • Arr10
  • Arr11
  • Arr12
  • Arr13
  • Arr14
  • Arr15
  • Arr16
  • Arr17
  • Arr18
  • Arr19
  • Arr20
All
  • All
  • Arr 1
  • Arr 2
  • Arr 3
  • Arr 4
  • Arr 5
  • Arr 6
  • Arr 7
  • Arr 8
  • Arr 9
  • Arr10
  • Arr11
  • Arr12
  • Arr13
  • Arr14
  • Arr15
  • Arr16
  • Arr17
  • Arr18
  • Arr19
  • Arr20

Rue Saint Benoît

Arrondissement 6
A left bank street reeking of left history with nearly every struggle for human rights represented by the socialists, feminists, poets, novelists, revolutionaries and republicans who lived here.

Rue Saint-Denis

Arrondissements 1, 2
The mediaeval northern access road to the centre of Paris often featured in Paris’ revolutionary history

Rue Saint Dominique

Arrondissement 7
A very long road full of very important government buildings, the old less expensive end with a cooperative restaurant and a feminist lawyer are now long gone

Rue Saint-Gilles

Arrondissement 3
The narrow road didn’t keep its secrets too well. Courbet was arrested here after the Paris Commune.

Rue Saint-Honoré

Arrondissement 1, 8
The oldest part of this historic West-East road through Paris was reworked by Haussmann. But you can get close to where Marx and Engel’s collaboration started.

Rue Saint-Jacques

Arrondissement 5
Paris’ oldest street now carries traffic one-way to the South. At the heart of the Latin Quarter, it has a hidden history of barricades and absinthe as well as of university education

Rue Saint-Joseph

Arrondissement 2
A short, narrow road where Zola was born and spent only his first three years. Well-deserving of a plaque!

Rue de Saint-Martin

Arrondissement 3
A street made for barricades and art. Eugene Delacroix, George Sand, Victor Hugo and Balzac all place their fictional barricades here.

Boulevard Saint-Michel

Arrondissement 6
The Boul’Mich was built by Haussmann to replace the early Left Bank north-south axis of the rue St Jacques, and to rip up part of the traditionally rebellious Latin Quarter.

Rue Saint-Victor

Arrondissement 5
A road with a huge meeting place that left events used for over half a century.

Rue de la Santé

Arrondissement 14
The infamous Prison de la Santé opened in 1867 on the street next to the hospital. It is now the only prison left within the city walls.

Boulevard Sebastopol

Arrondissement 3
Site of Lepage Frères arms depot, which was pillaged by the secret Seasons Club set up by Blanqui and Barbès.

Rue de Seine

Arrondissement 6
A road that was once the moat surrounding Paris and became the centre of the left scene in early post-war Paris.

Rue de Sèvres

A lengthy Paris street with history that runs from near the Boulevard St Germain in the 6th south-west to the Boulevard Pasteur in the 15th.

Sorbonne

Arrondissement 5
The best-known French university led the growth of a complex of partly-religious partly-educational buildings that created the city. Usually run by reactionaries it nonetheless drew towards it people with inquiring minds

Rue Soufflot

Arrondissement 5
The road leading up to the Pantheon saw barricades, bloody battles and hundreds of executions in 1848 and 1871.

Rue de la Sourdière

Arrondissement 1
An old narrow street near the centre of Paris with left literary connections with both the 1830s and the 1930s

Rue de Stockholm

Arrondissement 8
A back street close to the Gare St-Lazare it was a good place for the future Ho Chi Minh to stay in June 1919 when he first appeared on the Paris police’s radar

Rue du Temple

Arrondissements 3, 4A very old Paris road that now runs from the Hotel de Ville to the Place de la Republique. It was where Louis XVI was imprisoned in 1792.

Villa de la Tour

Arrondissement 16
A beautiful private square was where Jean Jaurès spent the last 15 years of his life before being murdered because of his opposition to World War 1

Rue de Tournon

Arrondissement
This 16th century street leading up from the rue de Seine to what is now the Luxembourg Palace has witnessed bombings and many many demonstrations

Avenue Trudaine

Arrondissement 9
An avenue with a major Paris Lycée named after a teacher shot during the Resistance, and where Lucie Aubrac taught from 1946.

Jardin des Tuileries

Like the Tuileries Palace (built in 1564) the garden was named after the tile-making factories that were established there in 1372 next to the 15-20 …

Rue d’Ulm

Arrondissements 5
A road with France’s top university where many French intellectuals like Althusser and Foucault, Bloch, Weil, Sartre and Césaire either taught or studied

Rue Vaneau

Arrondissement 7
A new street built just before the July 1830 Revolution, it was called rue Vanneau (with two n’s) when Marx lived there in 1843-1844, and rue Vaneau when Gide lived and died there in 1951.

Rue de Varenne

Arrondissement 7
A street with several huge mansions where Louis Aragon lived towards the end of his life, and where Mendes France was briefly prime minister.

Rue de Vaugirard

Arrondissements 6, 15
The longest street in Paris was an old Roman road. At its eastern end were the 1871 barricades against the Versaillais troops. Near the Western end is the Luxembourg Palace.

Rue Vavin

Arrondissement 6
A street with left memories stretching over a century, and one interwar building declared a historic monument.

Place Vendôme

Arrondissement 1
The Vendôme Square a stone’s throw from the Louvre Palace was both the home of wealthy powerful people and the Headquarters of the National Guard defending the Paris Commune in 1871.

Rue Victor Cousin

Arrondissement 5
A street running north from the Place de La Sorbonne that saw street fighting in May 1968 and again in 2006 between police and students

Avenue Victor Hugo

Arrondissement 16
Renamed avenue Victor Hugo in 1881 when he moved in, No 124 (at the time No. 54) was also where he died in 1885.

Rue Victor Schoelcher

Arrondissement 14
A street with a radical name was home for 20 years to one of France’s leading feminists, socialists and thinkers

Rue Vieille-du-Temple

Arrondissements 3, 4A near kilometre-long road running south to north through the heart of the Marais had a key target in the 19th century, the National Printing Works.

Avenue de Villars

Arrondissement 7
The expensive road that was birthplace of the illegitimate Louis Aragon

Hôtel de Ville / Paris Town Hall

Arrondissement 4
Every time an insurrection for political and economic democracy took place in France it was announced on the balcony or steps of Paris’ town hall, the Hôtel de Ville.

Quai Voltaire

Arrondissement 7
Named the Quai Voltaire in the revolutionary fervor of 1791 Daniel Stern lived in the riverside street at the time Marx visited her salon in 1844.

Place des Vosges / Place Royale

Arrondissement 4
The Royal Square with a Republican name where Victor Hugo lived for 15 years before witnessing the final overthrow of the monarchy

Avenue de Wagram

Arrondissements 8, 17
A major road from the Arc de Triomphe that hosts one of Paris’ most important meeting venues, the Salle Wagram